Can Planck Cores Spin?

NEOCLASSICAL PHYSICS AND QUANTUM GRAVITY
Imagine that nature emerges from a Euclidean 3D void space populated with immutable oppositely charged Planck spheres, which we call the electrino and the positrino. These are the only carriers of energy, in electromagnetic and kinetic form. They observe classical mechanics and Maxwell’s equations. Nature overlays Euclidean space (Map 1) with a lightly interacting Riemannian spacetime æther (Map 2). 𝗡𝗣𝗤𝗚 is compatible with GR, QM, and ΛCDM observations, while providing a superior narrative that explains nature and the universe.
For 𝗡𝗣𝗤𝗚 basics see: Idealized Neoclassical Model and the NPQG Glosssary.

NPQG hypothesizes that Planck cores can develop in black holes, particularly in galaxy center SMBH. Planck cores are the densest possible matter and energy in the universe. This leads to a rather perplexing question : Can Planck cores spin?

Note: Throughout this post I’ll use the strict definition of Planck core to mean those Planck spheres that are on the interior of the core, not the surface. Planck spheres on the interior can not transfer energy to any neighbor because all neighbors are already at the maximum energy.

Imagine different Planck cores in different SMBH, let’s say one core is not spinning and the other core is spinning. Does this mean the Planck spheres in the spinning core have more energy than the Planck spheres in the stationary core? How could that be if the particles in the Planck core are already maxed out at the Planck energy?

On the other hand, how could it be possible that Planck cores would be incapable of spinning? There is no way for the Planck spheres in the Planck core to latch on to fixed points in space. No, nothing could stop a Planck core from spinning, or for that matter from translating through space. But in either of these cases would the Planck core have momentum? I don’t think so. How could they have momentum if Planck cores don’t present a mass?

Let’s see how we can apply NPQG insight regarding the hybrid Euclidean-Riemannian geometry of the universe to the question about whether Planck cores spin. The geometry of absolute space is Euclidean — we have no origin, no way points, and no rulers. Space is completely symmetric. I suppose that means space is conserved as well according to Noether’s theorem. Space is physical and immutable. Space is conserved even though it is not exchanged in any transactions. Keep in mind that the Riemannian geometry isn’t a pure geometry – it is a set of fields and laws defined by discrete energetic charged Planck spheres and their parameters.

Euclidean space is conserved.

In a black hole with a Planck core, the core has the Planck energy per Planck sphere and the packing is hypothesized to be FCC or HCP. We should be able to determine the configuration pattern of the electrinos and positrinos theoretically. Of course there will also be defects of various types where there are departures from regularity.

Let’s head to the opposite end of the energy spectrum for a thought experiment. Let’s imagine an individual Planck sphere in 3D space, i.e., the Euclidean void. What does it mean for an individual Planck sphere to have zero energy in this geometry? Let’s say it means it has no physical motion (kinetic energy) and no electromagnetic energy stored as a potential. But how do we know it is not moving relative to a fixed point in space when we can not determine a fixed point in space? That’s perplexing. Without a reference point, we can’t know if the particle is moving or not and therefore we can’t tell if it has kinetic energy.

Can we tell if the Riemannian geometry of physical spacetime æther is moving relative to Euclidean space? Well if the Riemannian geometry of spacetime or its standard matter content is changing at all, then yes, some particles in spacetime are moving relative to space. And we can be sure that the Riemannian geometry of spacetime will always be changing, because spacetime æther contains energy and standard matter contains energy and free energy creates motion.

Let’s now turn back to the original question. Do Planck cores spin? My intuition says yes, they must be capable of spinning because there is nothing that could stop them. Mathematically, I would say that the Planck spheres in the Planck core can exceed the Planck energy because they are in a special reference frame where they are not surrounded by spacetime æther.

Dear reader, I hope my non-linear thinking on this subject has not been too confusing. Perhaps in the future I will be able to discuss this topic with a far clearer exposition. Cheers!

J Mark Morris : San Diego : California : July 17, 2020 : v1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s